High Five for Friday!

Hey peeps - it’s been a busy week!  I still managed to snag a few pics of some of the exciting / happy moments, though.  Yay!  Without further adieu, here are my favorite memories from this past week.

1. Our team survived the Ragnar Relay: trail edition.  Thank goodness!  I was so happy to be in these comfy clothes at the end of the race – it took everything to keep them dry and free of mud the entire weekend!

2. My friends and I grabbed dinner at our favorite sushi restaurant.  I totally forgot to snag a pic, but here is a glimpse of the restaurant from a really fun internet search.

3. I decided to go on a gluten free diet for three months.  I’m about three weeks in now, and love that I can eat this gluten free bread.  So yummy!

4. I had a ton of fun going through old pictures this week for this father’s day post.  Here’s one that didn’t make the blog post, but shows some of our extended family rockin’ our really cute 90s outfits.

5. There’s never a dull moment with this little munchkin!  I love her so much!

Linking up with Lauren Elizabeth

A Simple Trick for Achieving Success

I’ve only been in the working world for a handful of years, and I don’t quite consider myself truly successful.  I’ve definitely participated in my fair share of mistakes, lack of confidence and awkward conversations near the water cooler.  Nevertheless, I’ve noticed something different about people who I consider successful versus those that I don’t or the ones that I find just pretending.

Often, in the consulting world, we are taught little tricks to help us act more like a ‘consultant.’. If we’re not acting differently then why should our clients pay us the big bucks?  One of the tricks that I learned in one of my first years was to prevent giving away all of my candy too soon.  In the case of a consultant, the candy equaled our knowledge and experience from past projects.  If we taught the client everything we know in the first week then why would they continue to hire us in the weeks to come?

In the consulting industry, there is a pertinent reason for following this advice and, in many cases, it is certainly a valid approach.  However, if we follow this rationale and, essentially, covet all of our ideas, aren’t we really just giving into our fear of losing them?

I’ve come across many secrets and tips throughout my six years post-college life, but the most simple and important one is actually this: share your knowledge with people.  All of it.  I know that it’s a scary thought – perhaps one of the scariest ones in the working world – if I give away all of my candy, why would a company pay me?  But, my answer to that question is this: because they need you to make more.

If you give away all of your ideas, naturally your mind will want to find more, discover more, learn more.  Isn’t this practice what makes us more well-rounded and knowledgeable people?  When something in our lives is empty, we need to find a way to fill it up.  So, give away your secrets, tips and knowledge and then fill yourself up with more theories, more research, more talents.  The world needs you as an idea giver, not a hoarder.

Enhanced by Zemanta